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Adam Smith Institute – “What the Chancellor gave with one hand though, he took with the other”

“He hit firms large and small that make capital losses by restricting their exemptions—meaning less risk taking, less profit and fewer economic dividends…It was a similar story in personal allowances. While the taxman will let us keep more of what we earn from April next year, the Treasury won’t link this with inflation for another two, so millions more will be dragged into higher brackets.”

Centre for Policy Studies – “Not a Brexit Budget, but an NHS Budget”

“The overwhelming majority of the extra spending proposed will go towards meeting the pledge to increase health spending. That the Chancellor has managed to do this without increasing personal taxes is impressive, although it comes at the price of ensuring that we will remain in deficit rather than surplus – admittedly a far, far more manageable one than under Labour’s plans for the economy.”

Institute for Economic Affairs – “What happened to ending the deficit?”

“It will be more than a quarter of a century since the government last balanced the books; yet despite the deficit still sitting at £25.5bn per annum and the cost of servicing that debt ever on the rise, the Chancellor’s rhetoric suggests this is the new normal. Fiscal responsibility is being sidelined, giving way to short-term giveaways and unaffordable pledges.”

Low Incomes Tax Reform Group – “Low paid workers mustn’t be left in the lurch.”

“If the intermediary concludes that the new rules effectively neutralise the tax advantages of these arrangements, it is likely that workers will be pulled out of limited companies. If what we saw after the public sector changes is anything to go by, they could then find themselves encouraged into other dubious arrangements that help engagers protect their profitability.

Northern Powerhouse Partnership – “The critical investment we need is not being delivered”

“All Northern eyes will be on the Chancellor in the coming months to see if the Treasury sign off on Northern Powerhouse Rail, a scheme that will be transformational for economic growth and rebalancing the economy. Without it, the exciting potential for the Northern Powerhouse to boost the national economy’s growth trend won’t be realised.”

Resolution Foundation – A significant moment for Universal Credit

“The Chancellor has delivered a welcome boost to families on Universal Credit worth £630 a year. This will mean that the government’s flagship welfare reform is now more generous than the benefit system that it is replacing…In today’s Budget, [he] has significantly ended – but not eased – austerity for public services.”

Right to Life – “Good news for single parents”

“We also welcome the introduction of entitlement to bereavement leave for parents grieving the loss of a stillborn baby. We would like to see this bereavement leave extended further, to the loss of a child before twenty-four weeks. The loss and pain of losing a child, no matter how small, can never be underestimated. There is no time limit on grief and this should be reflected in Government policy.”

Taxpayers Alliance – “We need a much simpler and less burdensome tax system”

“The chancellor was right that ‘ending austerity’ should not mean tax hikes, and mostly resisted the temptation to squeeze families and businesses for even more….That said, the tax burden overall will be still be increasing. And to truly seize the opportunities afforded by Brexit, we should be looking at a much more serious and overdue reform of the tax code.”

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