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Below this article, we print one by Neil O’Brien who, in his two previous columns for this site (see here and here), has described why China now poses a major strategic problem for Britain.

Above it, we carry one by Tom Tugehdhat who, like our columnist, is a senior member of the recently-formed China Research Group.  In it, he sets out potential solutions.

And at the top of the site today, we report on what ConservativeHome’s panel of Party members have to say about the Government’s migration offer to Hong Kongers.

The site itself has been circumspect in offering a view about British-Chinese relations, because although China is a security threat, it is not the only one to the UK, nor necessarily the most immediate.

For there is also the external problem posed by Russia, which is capable of sparking a war in Eastern Europe, perhaps by accident and, as the Salisbury poisonings showed us, is also willing to strike her.

Then there is the internal challenge from Islamist extremism which, as Gerry Adams once said of the IRA, “hasnt’ gone away, you know”.  The Manchester Arena bombing is little more than three years old.

None the less, the “golden decade” of Anglo-Chinese relations that George Osborne promised in 2015 now looks like more of an ice age.  There are two immediate flashpoints.

First, Hong Kong.  The Government’s offer of residency and work rights extensions to Hong Kongers looks like a piece of counter-play.

If you menace freedom in Hong Kong, we will open our doors to its citizens – including its brightest and best.  And you will be left with nothing worth governing.  That’s our reading of what Ministers are up to.

Second, Huawei.  It appears that there will be no return to the status quo ante on the Chinese company post-Covid (whenever that may be).

Both these issues are highly topical and the Hong Kong row was raging last week.  We carried pieces about it by Tom Tugendhat and Bob Seely.

The Anglo-Chinese relationship is more important than, say, the row over Dominic Cummings and lockdown.  In recognition of that fact, we will re-run Tugedhat’s latest article for us for each day this week.

And there will be more about China on the site over the next few days.  On Friday, we hope to write more about those three different security threats, and how the UK should respond.

33 comments for: China 3) Why the stand-off over Hong Kong and the coming clash over Huawei matters

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