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Eustice George During Thursday's deliberations on the Budget debate, George Eustice, who won his home seat of Camborne and Redruth from the Lib Dems, gave his maiden speech and called on the Government to harness a culture of enterprise:

"My number one priority for the area will be economic regeneration. I was
delighted to hear the Chancellor say in his Budget that he does not
propose to make a further cut to total capital spending. If we want to
improve our infrastructure and competitiveness and rebalance our
economy, it is essential that we continue to invest in that
infrastructure. He is also right, however, that we should switch the
focus to creating new enterprises and businesses, and that in
particular we should encourage the development of new enterprise in
those regions such as mine that have perhaps been too dependent in the
recent past on the public sector. There is only one way out of the
current recession: through new businesses setting up and new industries
being created. We need to harness a culture in which entrepreneurs are
willing to get out there, take risks, have a go, and feel that they can
make a difference."

He was quick to emphasise that he sees the role of government as an enabler:

"Government cannot simply drop all the answers. I have heard a great
deal in the debate today about how Government can do everything, but
they cannot. In the final analysis, we need talented individuals to
come up with the solutions. The role of Government is to enable those
individuals, not to try to replace their role."

Offord Matthew Meanwhile Matthew Offord, who gained Hendon from Labour, spoke about the need to instill in people a sense of aspiration in his first Commons speech:

"Given the importance of cities to Britain’s future economic prosperity, I urge the Government to recognise that suburban constituencies must play a key role in their policies for urban regeneration. Many commentators share my view, recognising that suburbs are the forgotten dimension in our urban policies. There are many initiatives that could overcome that issue. In the past, the former Member for Sedgefield spoke about “Education, education, education”, but I think that that was too narrow a focus. I would prefer us to instil in our people a sense of “Aspiration, aspiration, aspiration”, which will continue with them throughout their adult lives. But we cannot do that on a national scale. We need to allow local people to implement the right social and economic priorities for themselves on a suburban scale."

"Under the previous Government there was an increase in violent crime. More than 40 years ago Robert Kennedy told an audience that there is another kind of violence besides physical violence—one that is slower, but just as deadly and just as destructive—and that is the violence of institutions, particularly when they become indifferent, show inaction and produce slow decay. That is, in essence, a neglect of aspirations by politicians and policy makers. Because we do not have any money, we must look at alternative ways of reducing our deficit and improving our country.

"Because of the massive economic deficit we must win the argument, particularly Conservative Members and with our colleagues the Liberal Democrats, that it is the opportunity of aspiration that will create private sector employment and pull us out of the state that we are in. It will not happen as a result of some of the objectives proposed by Opposition Members. We need to recognise that different communities work in different ways, be they rural, urban or suburban, and we have to give our constituents the ways and means to address the problems that they face and to introduce the right conditions for themselves."

Jonathan Isaby

3 comments for: In their maiden speeches George Eustice invites the Government to harness a culture of enterprise and Matthew Offord asks them to instill in people a sense of aspiration

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