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Natalie Elphicke is MP for Dover.

More than 28,000 people came into the UK through the small boats route alone last year. Many lives have been lost. What started as a trickle of boats and a few people has become a booming international criminal business, with ever greater numbers of illegal craft coming in day after day, month after month. Even on Christmas Day, the people smugglers didn’t stop plying their trade – putting even more lives at risk on the English Channel.

The range of departure countries is extraordinary and spans continents. Vietnam in the Far East, and the African countries of Eritrea and Somalia, as well as the Middle East: Iran, Iraq, Syria and more besides. Each of these routes has its own brokers and their own specialities. But they all have in common a clear belief that the UK is easy to break into and even easier to stay in.

Last year, records were broken on every measure. The record for the number of people arriving in a single day, for the number of unaccompanied young people arriving, for the number of people arriving in a month and a year (see here). It was a truly shocking year at the Dover border.

As the numbers have increased, so has the impact. Across the land, hotels, bed and breakfasts, old army barracks and rented housing were snapped up by the Home Office to house the equivalent population of a small town.

In addition, there’s the extra strain on GPs, schools, hospitals, skills and language training, as well as welfare payments. That doesn’t include the millions spent last year on new short-term facilities to hold and process migrants. The traditional facilities at Dover have simply been unable to cope with the numbers now arriving.

It’s not just a matter of money. It’s also one of national security. It is an uncomfortable truth, but one still the same, that not everyone who comes into our country through the illegal channel crossing route wishes us well.

People wanted for serious crimes, including those wanted by other intelligence services, have been detained in Dover as they tried to enter clandestinely by small boat. Not every person who lands on our beaches is picked up. Residents of coastal villages, such as Kingsdown and St Margaret’s, make regular reports of arrivals in the dead on night and in the early hours of the morning. Grown men knock on doors, hide in local woods where villagers walk their dogs, or are picked up by waiting cars and vans.

Beyond money and national security, there is also the question of fairness. It’s unfair to people choosing the right way to apply to come to the UK, when people are able to enter the UK illegally and remain. It’s also unfair to people seeking a way out of poverty, who want opportunity, and who are lawfully resident in our own country, including migrants and refugees who come into the UK through legal routes of entry.

Moreover, the bottom line is that no-one has to make these dangerous crossings. We need to be crystal clear about that. Every person getting into the water is already safe in France, which has an established and responsible asylum system. People are safe in many places before France too, both inside the European Union and elsewhere.

We also need to be clear that there are legal routes of entry into the UK. These are the routes that should be taken. Many people who are making the crossing are fleeing poverty, not persecution. They lack opportunity, not safety. The lure of the UK is predominantly economic. That’s why people borrow and save to pay to come to the UK. It’s an investment in their future.

And right now, there are hundreds of thousands of work visas up for grabs – in a huge array of sectors, including charity worker visas, seasonal worker visas, young persons’ mobility visas, creative workers’ visa, health and social care, HGV, and even amusement arcade work. You can come and work in the UK legally, and millions of people do. But you need to go about it the right way.

There are safe and legal routes for family members, too. Any person with a case for family reunion can make that case on behalf of their relatives in the UK and from the UK. There is absolutely no need for any close family member to be smuggled in at the dead of night.

It is absolutely right that the UK should help those most in need around the world and we do. But encouraging or facilitating people smuggling is not the way to do it. We need to bring an end to the small boat crossings and stop the dangers of people being in the hands of people smugglers and the risk of further deaths on the Channel.

This is the first of two articles by the author on small boats.  The second will be published on this site on Thursday.