Published:

Johnson to lead Commons tributes to Amess

“Boris Johnson will lead tributes to Sir David Amess in the House of Commons on Monday as debate rages about how drastically to step up security in the wake of the fatal attack on the Southend MP at his constituency surgery… The Speaker of the House of Commons, Sir Lindsay Hoyle, has torn up the parliamentary timetable to allow MPs to spend much of Monday afternoon paying tribute to Amess, after a minute’s silence at 2.30pm. Johnson will lead a special debate in which MPs will be able to share their memories of the Essex MP, who was first elected in 1983. Several including Hoyle have already made clear they believe the best tribute to him would be to carry out his long-held wish that Southend become a city, a hope that was echoed by Amess’s family in their statement on Sunday.” – The Guardian

  • Coat of arms to sit beside that of Cox in Commons – The Times

More:

  • Police examine Qatar link over killing – The Times
  • Officers say attack on MP linked to Islamist extremism – The Guardian
  • Suspect ‘radicalised after watching YouTube videos of hate preacher Anjem Choudary’ – The Sun
  • Counterterrorism police swoop on properties – The Times

>Yesterday:

He was a patriot with so much to give, say family

“Sir David Amess’s family have said that achieving city status for Southend would be a way of paying tribute to a “patriot and man of peace”. In their first public comments since the MP’s murder, his family thanked people for the “wonderful, wonderful tributes paid to David following his cruel and violent death. It truly has brought us so much comfort.” Amess, 69, was married with five children, and in a statement last night the family said: “The support shown by friends, constituents and the general public alike has been so overwhelming. It has given us strength.” They urged people “to set aside their differences and show kindness and love to all” so that some good might come from his death.” – The Times

  • We have been in denial about the violent sickness in British society – Nick Timothy, Daily Telegraph
  • Scorn not the simplicity of a man who served – Trevor Phillips, The Times

Ellwood doubles-down on call to pause face-to-face meetings with constituents

“A Tory former Defence Minister doubled-down on his call for a temporary suspension of public meetings between MPs and their constituents this evening, as he warned ‘there could be a copycat-style attack’ following the killing of Sir David Amess by a suspected terrorist. Tobias Ellwood, the chairman of the Commons Defence Select Committee, urged a ‘pause in face-to-face’ consultations between parliamentarians and members of the public until a safety review had been completed in the wake of Sir David’s death on Friday. His proposal was shot down by defiant Conservatives including former Cabinet minister David Davis. Labour’s Harriet Harman called for an official review of MPs’ safety, while ex-Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott also rallied against ‘airport-style screening’ – but told the BBC she would support meeting constituents behind a screen to prevent possible stab attacks.” – Daily Mail

  • Parliamentarians continue to hold constituency surgeries after killing – The Guardian
  • MPs confront need to find balance between accessibility and security – FT
  • MPs will be offered private guards amid ‘patchy’ protection – The Times
  • Online trolls could be stripped of their anonymity under plans to tackle abuse – Daily Telegraph

Editorial:

  • A free society requires that those who hold elected office should feel secure – The Times

>Today:

>Yesterday:

Treasury warns of ‘diminishing returns’ from green investment…

“Tensions are rising between Rishi Sunak and Boris Johnson today as the Treasury warned of ‘diminishing returns’ from green investment and the government was rocked by a wave of bitter sniping. A leaked briefing ahead of the COP26 summit says the spending needed to achieve Net Zero is ‘uncertain’ and the positive impact of ‘ever more investment’ in greening the economy is likely to reduce. The document, which according to the Observer accompanied a presentation to key groups outside government, also cautioned that tax rises could be required to balance the ‘erosion of tax revenue from fossil-fuel related activity’. As frictions bubble up between the two most powerful figures in government ahead of the Budget on October 27 and crucial summit, Treasury officials have also been complaining about ‘economic illiteracy’ at No10 over lavish spending promises and the danger of inflation running out of control.” – Daily Mail

  • Fresh rift between Johnson and Sunak – The Sun
  • Chancellor considers cutting VAT on household energy bills – FT
  • Government to fund new nuclear power station as part of Net Zero drive – Daily Telegraph

More:

  • Russia boasts it could ‘come to the rescue’ of Britain by increasing gas supplies – Daily Mail
  • UK snubbed in first stage of €2bn hydrogen plant scheme – Daily Telegraph

…as Sunak prepares to launch online sales tax

“Rishi Sunak is stepping up plans for an online sales tax to level the playing field between tech behemoths and high street retailers after delaying an overhaul of business rates. Treasury officials have accelerated work on a new e-commerce tax in the past few weeks and are scoping out details of a potential levy, including what goods and services will be covered, sources told The Daily Telegraph. Whitehall insiders said that a so-called “Amazon tax” under a wider business rates shake-up is “clearly the direction of travel” being considered by the Chancellor, but that final decisions will be pushed out beyond the upcoming Budget. The move is likely to prove controversial and comes after the US President Joe Biden put together a global deal on how to tax Big Tech.” – Daily Telegraph

  • Chancellor urged to slash a ‘Girls’ Night Out’ tax on wine drinkers – The Sun

>Today: Dr Gerard Lyons in Comment: The three-arrowed approach to economic policy that Britain needs

UK says China is welcome to invest in non-strategic parts of economy

“The minister hosting Britain’s “global investment summit” this week said China is welcome to carry on investing in non-strategic parts of the UK economy and backed Saudi investment in Newcastle United Football Club in spite of human rights concerns. Anne-Marie Trevelyan, the new international trade secretary, claimed this week’s conference, to be attended by 200 leading investors, would “rocket boost” global interest in Britain, particularly in the green economy. But she conceded that Britain, as an open economy, was vulnerable to supply chain shocks and that Christmas could be disrupted by global trade problems. “The clear message that we’re hearing is that there are disruptions which are going to last some months,” she said in an interview with the Financial Times.” – FT

  • Truss condemns Iran as Zaghari-Ratcliffe loses appeal against conviction – Daily Mail

Comment:

  • Global Britain is our route back to prosperity – Liam Fox MP, Daily Telegraph

Labour urges Raab to tackle justice system ‘chaos’

“The shadow justice secretary, David Lammy, has urged Dominic Raab to tackle the “chaos” in the justice system before unpicking human rights law, after Raab said he wanted to curb the power of the European court of human rights (ECHR) over the government. Raab used an interview with the Sunday Telegraph to signal that he would be reviewing the Human Rights Act, which brought the European convention on human rights into UK law, with a view to constraining the influence of the Strasbourg court. But Lammy said that was the wrong priority. “Rape convictions are at historic lows and women are rapidly losing faith in the criminal justice system, while record backlogs have left the courts at breaking point. And yet the priority for Dominic Raab seems to be undermining vital human rights legislation that protects us all,” he said.” – The Guardian

News in Brief:

  • Beware efforts to build a public health panopticon – Henry Hill, CapX
  • The death of David Amess and the narcissism of the discourse – Sam Leith, The Spectator
  • We are in danger of losing our humanity – Miriam Cates, UnHerd
  • Green gift for China – Jun Arima, The Critic