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Brexit bill 1) Javid leads Tory attacks on Brexit law change

“Boris Johnson saw off a threat to his political authority last night after former cabinet ministers attempted a parliamentary revolt against him. Senior Tories, led by the ex-chancellor Sajid Javid, defied a three-line whip and abstained on legislation that would give ministers the power to override parts of the EU withdrawal agreement. In the end the government comfortably won the vote by a majority of 77 with the support of the DUP. Among Tories who abstained was Mr Javid, along with two former attorney-generals, Geoffrey Cox and Jeremy Wright. Two former Northern Ireland secretaries, Karen Bradley and Julian Smith, also failed to vote, as did the chairman of the foreign affairs select committee, Tobias Ellwood.” – The Times

  • Tory revolt grows over plans to amend the Brexit divorce deal – Daily Telegraph
  • Johnson failed to sway Tory rebels over Brexit Bill ‘safety net’ – Daily Telegraph
  • Internal market bill passes by 77 votes amid Tory party tension – The Guardian
  • Rebellion over contentious Brexit bill – FT
  • Bid to override Brexit divorce deal passes first hurdle – Daily Mail
  • Controversial Brexit bill passes first Commons test – The Sun
Comment
>Today:

Brexit bill 2) As Johnson tells rebellious Tories, Brussels put a gun on the table

“Boris Johnson accused Brussels of putting a “revolver on the table” last night as he fought to quell a rebellion from the government benches against a bill that ministers have admitted breaks international law. The prime minister said the EU was “threatening to carve tariff borders across our own country” and that the UK Internal Market Bill, which seeks to override aspects of the Northern Ireland protocol, was to “neutralise that threat”. The protocol, which the government agreed to last year, kicks in in the event of a no-deal Brexit to prevent a hard border in Ireland. The bill, which Mr Johnson is trying to fast-track this week, seeks to alter aspects of that agreement “notwithstanding” domestic or international law.” – The Times

  • PM wants a deal and threat is just a tactic, says Ireland – The Times
  • EU can resolve Brexit row to prevent no deal, says Irish foreign minister – Daily Telegraph
  • Rebel alliance: the Tory politicians opposing new Brexit bill – The Guardian
  • Could Boris Johnson’s tactics break the impasse over a deal? – Daily Mail
Comment
>Yesterday:

Brexit bill 3) Hague: Breaching international law would leave Britain perilously exposed

“It will not have been easy for Geoffrey Cox, a Conservative MP and strong supporter of Brexit, to say that he could not back the proposals in the Internal Market Bill that the Government admits will breach international law. By all accounts he had protracted discussions with Downing Street before coming to his view that “it is unconscionable that this country, justly famous for its regard for the rule of law around the world, should act in such a way”. He spoke with the experience and authority of a former attorney general. I have the different perspective of a former foreign secretary. But I come to the same conclusion.” – Daily Telegraph

Minister says call police if your neighbours break rule of six

“A minister has urged people to report their neighbours to the police if they see them violating the government’s new “rule of six” coronavirus restriction. Any social gathering of more than six is against the law and people could be fined up to £3,200 if they do not abide by the measure, which applies inside and out and came into force yesterday. Yesterday Kit Malthouse, the policing minister, said that concerned neighbours should report violations to the police’s non-emergency number, 101. He said that the government was looking at other routes because of concerns about the volume of work for the police. “We are in discussions about what reporting mechanisms there might be, but there is obviously the non-emergency number that people can ring and report issues they wish to,” he told Today on BBC Radio 4.” – The Times

  • Brits urged by minister to snitch on neighbours – The Sun
  • Crisis in NHS hospitals with health workers unable to access Covid-19 tests – Daily Telegraph
  • Backlog of nearly 200,000 tests in government labs – FT
  • Virus tests run out as labs struggle with demand – The Times
  • Schools ‘will grind to a halt’ unless Covid testing improves – The Guardian
  • Shortage of tests in 10 worst-hit hotspots – The Guardian
  • UK faces looming alcohol addiction crisis – Daily Mail
  • The 17 local authority areas where cases are not rising – Daily Mail
Comment

Replace furlough and stop firms ‘firing and rehiring’, Starmer to tell PM

“The Labour leader will accuse the prime minister of failing to get the basics of coronavirus testing right or formulate a plan for care homes over the summer and of attempting to “re-open old wounds over Brexit”. Addressing Johnson directly in a speech delivered virtually to the TUC Congress, he will say: “Get your priorities right. Get on with defeating this virus.” Under the coronavirus job retention scheme, which will end on 31 October, workers placed on leave have received 80% of their pay, up to a maximum of £2,500 a month. Johnson has refused to extend the scheme, saying it would only keep people “in suspended animation”.” – The Guardian

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And finally, Vine attacks book’s lurid claims of sex and booze in Cameron clique

“The diaries of the wife of a former Conservative minister have reignited tensions at the heart of the close-knit clique that surrounded David Cameron in his years as Tory leader. Extracts from The Secret Diary of an MP’s Wife, a memoir by Sasha Swire, the wife of Sir Hugo Swire, which is serialised in The Times this week, have portrayed Mr Cameron, his wife, Samantha, and the former chancellor George Osborne in their most intimate moments, prompting criticism from Sarah Vine, the wife of Michael Gove. Writing in the Daily Mail yesterday, Vine accused Lady Swire, the daughter of the former defence secretary Sir John Nott, of an “innate self-confidence and complete inability to self-censor” and described the book as “calculating” and “disturbing”.” – The Times

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